Taxonomy – Caitlin Johnson


Domain: Eukaryota

It’s not just the nucleus:

it’s the membrane-envelope

keeping us from oozing out;

it’s the matriarchal mitochondria

tracing us back before even Eve.


Kingdom: Animalia

Sometimes we forget

that we are animals, too-

we love to expunge

the evidence.


Phylum: Chordata

Musculature is not enough.

We need to grow a fucking backbone,

prove ourselves capable of contortions.


Class: Mammalia

We reject the reptilian brain.

We reject the scaled skin.

We reject the gills.


We demand the milk.


Order: Primates

Little fingers, little tails.

Eyes that seem to know.

& we hide in the trees.


Family: Hominidae

& what is so great

about the Great Apes?

The bonobos, the gorillas, the chimpanzees – sure.

But then comes the fourth.


Genus: Homo

Struggling to become upright/upstanding/upheavers.

Striding into the scrum.

Leaving antiquity, entering the man-made universe.


Species: H. sapiens

It’s not enough to conquer.

We must humiliate, as well:

subjugate, colonize, destroy.

The natural world?

No. The human one.


cj-bio-picCaitlin Johnson holds a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Lesley University. Her work has appeared in Carcinogenic Poetry, Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, Narrative Northeast, Pembroke Magazine, Vagina: The Zine, and Wild Quarterly, among other outlets. A chapbook, Boomerang Girl, was published in 2015 by Tiger’s Eye Press, and a full-length collection, Gods in the Wilderness, was published in 2016 by Pink.Girl.Ink. Press.


Exam conditions – Katie Lewington


I can’t believe I have to give myself permission

these stapled sheets are winding me up no end

pen tapping as if the feet of Astaire

I pick it up and put it down

an effortless weight

too many ghosts are swirling around the ticking of the clock


and scratching nibs


lessons learnt –

the power of three, commas and paragraphs

bulging thoughts unable to word

throbbing heat beneath the skin

less resistance

put more work in

then able

to put it all behind me

and begin.


kl-picKatie Lewington is a UK-based writer and has been drafting, editing and rewriting her bio since she started submitting to literary magazines and journals two years ago. It isn’t as if she doesn’t know who she is, she just isn’t sure what is relevant. Her creative writing can be read at She can be contacted through Twitter @idontwearahat.


Number 12 – Claudia Delicato


Rays of light in the corridor. Tracks of electromagnetic spectrum in floating dust. Bathroom’s door is open. I stretch my leg to plunge my feet in. I fail in practice but my theory is on it. Smell of northern European cities, I turn my head and blame the body lotion. I feel safe in memories. I sink into the tub declaring a national holiday in between my extremities.


cd-picClaudia Delicato is a 23-year-old Italian momentarily living in Belgium. She has been writing since she learnt how to hold a pen: she loves poetry the most, writing in English, Italian, and Spanish. You can find her work at – hungerness is her nom de plume. She is so enthusiastic about sharing her writing (and reading) passion that she started running spoken words events in the city of Ghent.

The status of Pluto – Kieran Rundle


“Pluto is no longer a planet.”

You whispered it to me, a venomous secret,

while we laid on the pillow of fresh mowed grass

and examined the velvet void consuming the sky above us,

admiring the warriors against the dark,

the blanket of 100 billion gold and white fires.


“It doesn’t really affect your life.”

Your secret stunned me in my midnight haze.

Why were we trying to limit the icy chaos of a world

to fit a structure that our hypocritical organization deemed worthy

when it is well over 100 billion yards away?


“It’s now a dwarf planet.”

The moondust pirouetted above our eyelashes,

moth wings fluttered with the anxiety

of pinning astronomical entities to a corkboard

and then removing them when someone exacts

a modern definition

that excludes something 100 million years old.


“It didn’t lose exclusivity, but gained an epithet!”

You tried to console my lightning reactions.

Pluto was simply too deemed too small for its status now.

It would never be told. It would exist in ignorance.

How bitter science can be to something that we deem small,

but is over 100 kilometers wide?


“It’s funny, how quickly things change.”

Nothing had changed.

Torchlights in the sky can monitor over 100 billion of our years.

We see the farthest ones as they were over 100 minutes ago.

I shuddered, watching the sky die,

and we were too concerned with demoting Pluto.


“The status of Pluto” first appeared in Volume Four of Sincerely Magazine.


kr2016Kieran Rundle, a high school student, is the owner and editor-in-chief for Sincerely Magazine LLC. She is on the staff for Miracle Magazine, and has worked for three years as an upper editor on Albemarle High School’s Literary Magazine. She is an award winning artist, poet, prose writer, and playwright. Her work can be found in a plethora of places including Charlottesville Area Transit Busses, The UVA Special Collections Library, Quail Bell Online Magazine, and the Crossroads III Anthology.  She is also an avid theatre kid, cat lover, stargazer, cookie eater, and chocolate addict. Find her at